Supporting Literacy

December 14, 2016

Before you load up on the latest toys and gadgets this holiday season, take another look at books and the benefits to your child!

ANOTHER LOOK AT BOOKS!

“Once you learn to read, you will be forever free.” — Frederick Douglass

supporting-literacyKindergarten readiness… the 3rd grade reading guarantee… expectations for children are on the rise and it is important for parents and families to give their child the best possible start.
Enrolling your child in high-quality early childhood education is a great step, especially when teachers and families work together to connect classroom and home learning! Yet we know the greatest learning happens at home – with you!

Remember families, you are their FIRST and BEST teacher. Research shows parent involvement in early literacy can have a direct connection to academic achievement.

Here are some researched tips and activities that you can do at home to help your child become a reader and set him/her up for future success!

 

  • TALK TO YOUR CHILD

    Language and literacy go hand in hand. Draw their attention to new words simply by talking to them. Peak their interest when you give everything a name, tell stories, and explain what you are doing. Children who hear more words have a larger vocabulary, which aides in their journey to be a successful reader!

  • READ TOGETHER EVERY DAY

    When you read together, make it fun and interactive!
    Try using different or silly voices. Children learn best through play – help them learn the joy of words! Build reading into your daily routine whether before bedtime, after school, after dinner, or during playtime.

  • POINT TO WORDS AS YOU READ

    Point out letters and punctuation giving your child the understanding that print carries a message, and helps him or her learn letter names and sounds.

  • VISIT THE LIBRARY

    Ask a librarian for recommendations for good books – they love to help!

  • ASK QUESTIONS ABOUT THE BOOK

    Ask questions during and after reading. For example: what do you think will happen now? What is this? Why did they go there? And let your child ask questions! This ignites their creativity and comprehension.

  • POINT OUT PRINT EVERYWHERE

    Environmental print is the print we see on signs, bumper stickers, labels and more. Point out special letters and words. This lets your child understand that these letters have meaning and begin to recognize them.

 

  • USE MEDIA & TECHNOLOGY WISELY

    Doctors and researchers recommend limiting the amount of screen time children are allowed. Why not make this limited time educational? There are some wonderful educational television programs and apps that promote learning.

    Some examples are:

    • TV – Sesame Street, Word Girl, Super Why, Wild Kratts, and Daniel Tiger’s Neighborhood. These are all on PBS so no cable is needed.
    • APPS – Dr. Seuss’s ABC, Write my Name, Starfall Learn to Read, BOB books, Fish School, Duck Duck Moose, and Learn with Homer

  • READ IT AGAIN AND AGAIN

    Kids love to hear the same book read over and over!

    It can feel tedious, but this is your child’s way of investigating the world and mastering new skills. Young children don’t often know how to predict what will happen – knowing is part of the fun.

    Repetition is also key to mastering skills, so your child learns words as well as the rhythm and flow of how words connect.

Kara Beckner-Evans is an Intervention Specialist at The Childhood League Center and where she has taught preschool children for more than a decade. Kara’s students love to hear her read and her favorite author is Mo Williems (of the Don’t Let The Pigeon Drive The Bus series).
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